Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Q&A: Brian Lawrence on Being Independent

First came the blockbusters. Now, the indy crowd is showing up to film in and around Detroit.

Local Brian Lawrence is ready for it. The director has an independent film studio here called Planet Four Films. He also has an acting school (The Actor's Workshop) in Royal Oak. He now is filming “Rabid” in the rural areas around Macomb County. He lives in Sterling Heights and attended Michigan State University. (More on Time.com: See TIME's special report "The Committee To Save Detroit")

“Rabid” will be Lawrence's fifth full-length feature film, after writing and directing “Corrupted Minds” (soon to be re-released internationally as “Panic in Detroit”), “She Kills,” and the early 2011 releases of  “The Politics of Street Crime” and the documentary “Dreams – The Movie.”

“Rabid” revolves around a range of characters from a small town grappling with the stresses of family struggles and a difficult economy, showing the tragic cost of acting out rage and revenge.

“The characters in ‘Rabid' live on the edge of the gun rights, tea party and militia movement,” said Lawrence.  “It will be a very timely film and we have gathered together an international team, on both sides of the camera.” (More on Time.com: See pictures of Detroit's beautiful, horrible decline)

Q: What do you think about filming in Detroit and Michigan as a whole?

A: The film industry is almost shocking. It shows what tax incentive can do. Giving tax rebates/incentives has worked like a miracle. The industry was almost dead. Then, with the incentive, our student levels have finally started rising again. We've been teaching for 26 years, and, last year, we had to turn away people. We're actually having trouble with our students' attendance because they're working so much. … In LA, there's no big story if you're making a film. It's exciting here; and that's good for your morale.

Q: What do you think of other productions going on here in Detroit, especially shows like “Detroit 1-8-7” that have a lot of local landmarks in them?

A:  In our first feature, “Panic In Detroit,” the city itself was the star. “Detroit 1-8-7” also stars Detroit -- without our city as the backdrop, the show wouldn't have the same energy, authenticity.  From what we hear from those who've come to Detroit from LA to work on production, they've been energized by shooting in what to them is such a unique, vibrant setting.  This same notion is echoed by other Hollywood production teams who are thrilled to be shooting in our city. … We all want to watch it. Even if we don't like the show, we've got an investment here. (More on Time.com: See 10 things to do in Detroit)

Q: Can Detroit serve as a co-star in these movies, television shows and the like?

A:  Detroit can and is serving as a co-star in a number of movies and TV shows.  Many of us who live in the area may take the diversity of its physical possibilities for granted, but location scouts from LA are like kids in a candy store when they tour the city and outlying areas.

Q: Why is Detroit is “a spectacular place to shoot,” as you have said before?

A: To be honest, Detroit looks good. The population at 900,000 feels right for the city – that should be the population, not 1.8 million. People don't like that there's so many vacant areas. But what's wrong with that returning to nature? With our latest film, we wanted a certain look, so we found locations up in Romeo, and New Baltimore. But we found out in those areas you have more trouble finding country lots than in Detroit itself. This is a city, yet you can find open fields. You can see timing passing; there's some sadness in it. In the 1950s, more films were shot in Detroit – commercials, industrial films – than in other areas. Then, everyone went to LA. There were the remnants of infrastructure. Now, we're rebuilding. It's something of a renaissance for the film industry. We don't have enough infrastructure, not enough technicians. I have a friend who owns huge equipment rental place, and he cannot stock stuff enough. That's exciting to see. (More on Time.com: Read a postcard of how philanthropy is remaking Detroit)

Q: Do you think you can really make a go of it here for the long term?

A: Before, you hated to give your heart to Detroit. People were tired of Detroit somehow being so unlucky. ‘How can it always happen here?' we wondered. I would do post-production in LA, but then we would need to teach the (acting) classes, so we had to come back. Still, I was like a homing pigeon. Like my friend with equipment rental, at one point I thought might as well as make complete move to LA. But with the resurgence, I don't even think of moving. … For people like George Lucas, things can go regional now because of technology – there are pockets (of production) everywhere.

Q: What tips do you have for someone who wants to be an actor or even an extra?

A:  Commit to training to be the best actor possible and learn how the business works. Be professional -- punctual, precise and pleasant. Anyone who wants to pursue the profession seriously must study and work hard at it.  The only way to ensure steady work is to be among the best. Background or extra work, while less demanding, is still an important part of movie making and anyone working as an extra also needs to be professional and reliable.

See more from TIME's yearlong look at Detroit

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

+ READ ARTICLE

When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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