Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Taking A Bad Angle

Props to Jack O'Reilly, the mayor of Dearborn, Mich., for recently setting straight teabag-ist Sharron Angle, the Nevada Senate candidate who crassly tried to re-imagine the Detroit suburb as some beachhead for the creeping influence of "Sharia law."

“She's doesn't know what she's talking about,” said O'Reilly on Friday about Angle's comments.
Well, that's for sure. Consider:

“My thoughts are these, first of all, Dearborn, Mich., and Frankford, Texas, are on American soil, and under constitutional law. Not Sharia law. And I don't know how that happened in the United States,” she said. “It seems to me there is something fundamentally wrong with allowing a foreign system of law to even take hold in any municipality or government situation in our United States.”

She may not know what she's talking about, but she sure knows whom to talk about. She knows that stoking the fear and hatred of Muslims, and more specifically of Arab Americans, that abounds in her ideological neck of the woods represents her best path to Congress — even if that means lying on a community thousands of miles away from the state she claims to want to represent.

If she knew what she was talking about, she'd know that Dearborn is home to Muslims, Christians, Jews and a host of other worshippers. (And probably a few atheists, too.) She'd know that its Arab American population represents 30 percent of the city, and that Dearborn is home to 60 churches and seven mosques, as O'Reilly pointed out.

If she knew what she was talking about, she'd also know that the same types of so-called religious "laws" (usually read: cultural practices) that hate mongers suggest are "taking hold" in Dearborn have been openly in effect on these shores since the first Puritans showed up with their "good books" in hand.

No, I'm not much in favor of anybody's religious law. But the truth is, I've seen the same sort of restrictive, chauvinist, sexist and/or anachronistic cultural attitudes that Angle and others want us to find so scary and bothersome in Islam in full swing right out in the open from one end of this country to the other — and it's not Muslims propagating this stuff.

If Angle has an issue with traditional Muslim practices in Dearborn, does she also have a problem with, say, the Amish or Mormon communities scattered in and around rural outposts all over the nation, hewing faithfully to their old traditions in an ever-modernizing world? Does she have a problem with the "Biblical laws" that compel dress-only-wearing Pentacostal women (we used to call them "sanctified ladies" when I was growing up) in black communities throughout the South and Midwest? Is Angle concerned about creeping "Hasidic law" when she considers the thriving Orthodox Jewish communities that abound in places like Southfield, Mich., or Brooklyn, N.Y.?

What about the "laws" of the Jehovah's Witnesses? Or the Hindu? The Sikh? The Catholic Church? The Southern Baptists? Would Angle say their presence on American soil also is "fundamentally wrong" or an affront to the Constitution?

I doubt it, just as I doubt that she really knows — or cares — much about what Muslims in Dearborn are up to either. Because Angle's aim isn't to defend a Constitution that's not under attack or to promote rationality over religion in our social relationships. Rather, her objective is to signal her willingness to sign on to the bigotry and xenophobia that teabaggers and others on the far right hope to ride back into political power this year. If smearing ethnic groups in an unfamiliar Detroit suburb through dog whistle politics helps her cause, she's clearly on board.

If there's anything "fundamentally wrong," surely it's that.
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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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