Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

So What's Wrong With Urban Farming Anyway?

In addition to opposing land management strategies that would "displace" Detroit residents by clearing out abandoned homes, Jesse Jackson is also now coming out strong against the idea of large-scale farming in the city limits.

"Detroit needs investment in industry, housing and construction -- not bean patches," Jackson told host Paul W. Smith on WJR-AM 760.  "If people want to farm, they'll farm in zones."

OK, I agree that Detroit is, or at least should be, a manufacturing power first and foremost. Building stuff that people want to buy will always be the key to economic relevance. Nothing wrong with planning for the day when we can churn out pallets of solar panels and windmill blades over at the old Budd plant or wherever.

But why does this totally preclude the idea that agribusiness can thrive here? Why can't Detroit seize on its manufacturing roots to revitalize its industrial sector, spur growth in construction and, at the same time, make space for substantial agricultural operations?

We have more than 138 square miles of land, plenty of it having been empty for a very long time. You mean to tell me that there's nowhere in Detroit that would be feasible for growing food on any sizable scale? Yes, I get that the region would do better to use some of the outlying land around the exurbs. But we can't even talk about moving a basketball team without venomous exchanges among regional leaders, so I can't see the wisdom in suggesting Detroit continue twiddling its thumbs on land issues in hopes of a workable regional solution.

Further, we've got major farmers ready to move into the city and set up shop. Where are the big industrial operations that are waiting — pleading — for the chance to get on the tax rolls?

When it comes to quality-of-life issues in Detroit, the limited access to fresh fruits and vegetables is often cited. Now granted, I'm not suggesting that Detroiters are flocking to the coon man en masse — there're still places like the Eastern Market and some good independent grocers in the city — but I don't get the fierce opposition to the idea of adding another dimension to that supply or to the city's economy.

I'm not suggesting that everyone don overalls and grab a hoe — shoot, I can't even keep a cactus plant alive — but unless there's compelling data out there to suggest that Detroit couldn't benefit by setting aside some land for agricultural use, what's the issue here? And really, it's not as if I'm looking for a reason to support some giant farm conglomerate. I think community farms are a wonderful thing, too, and should be encouraged also.

I'm asking sincerely here and expecting lucid responses: What are the truly compelling reasons as to why a large urban farm wouldn't be a good idea for Detroit? Hey, maybe you're right...but for now, I can't see it.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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