Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Whetting Your Appetite for More Detroit

Sometimes, you need to be a stranger in your own city.

Forget your usual haunts. Ignore traditional routes. Forgo friendly faces. It forces you to rethink Detroit. And that's not a bad thing.

This weekend, I attended Culinary Escapes' “Detroit Progressive Lunch Tour.” This four-hour, fine-dining extravaganza was filling in both mind and body. I ate some tasty crocodile (Fishbone's Rhythm Kitchen Café, of course) and experienced the city through fresh eyes – and taste buds. Where else but Detroit can you eat a perfectly cooked piece of cod battered in a beer called “Ghettoblaster?” That came from Foran Grand Trunk (and Motor City Brew Works). Foran's also gave my fellow diners and I one of the city's best Ruben sandwiches inside this magnificent pre-Civil War building. And we ate way too many Better Made potato chips.

I attended the tour solo, forcing myself to chat up the other diners and get their take on the city, its food and its people. This is a city that constantly surprises you, and that for me remains part of its allure. No matter how many times I visit, no matter how much I think I know, no matter how many people I meet…there is always something else to learn. And that, my bloggie friends, is one more reason I choose to stay.

Some background on my tour: Ann Wilson founded Culinary Escapes in 2008. The goal is to create “culinary adventurers” with walking food tours of Detroit suburbs Royal Oak and Birmingham and downtown Detroit eateries. Culinary Escapes was the first company in Southeastern Michigan to offer walking food tours, a trend already prevalent in Chicago, New York and Seattle.

The tour gives you an insider's view of an eatery's or chef's personal food philosophy. For example, the sous chef at Small Plates Detroit explained the thinking behind the tapas dishes they serve and why. Additionally, Culinary Escapes exposes your palettes to a wide variety of regional Michigan foods. That focus on offering Michigan-made products is yet another reason why Foran's remains among my favorite watering holes. They do everything they can to use locally grown food. The same is true at Angelina Italian Bistro – the chef there told us that 99 percent of its food is made from scratch and much of it comes from local sources. (Try the pasta there; it's bananas. So good. There's this ravioli made with pulled pork. Trust me on this one.)

We walked to most places, which was surprising as well. It is impressive how many nice, friendly dining establishments there are in such a short distance. The tour took us to Vicente Cuban Cuisine, another new one for me (although it is five years old; I fell off the cool bus in 2005 when I had my first kid, so that is why I missed it entirely). I loved how the owner, Maria, made sure we had enough to eat. I even cleaned my plate in her honor. It was no problem at all.

Here's what else I learned from my lovely tour guide and fellow patrons:

--Detroit's street were built on a hub-and-spoke system just like Washington D.C. and Paris

--The fountain at Campus Martius was designed by the same company that did the one at the Ballagio in Los Vegas. It also can go 48 hours without repeating its pattern.

--Houdini used to have a magic shop where Foran's is now

--Detroit did not have a welcome center until Inside Detroit opened its doors along Woodward two years ago. (Check out its tours as well. They look crazy fun.)

--Detroit has the second largest theater district in the county (behind New York) with more than 13,000 seats in a two-block radius.

--Second Baptist Church in Greektown was a stop on the Underground Railroad, and you can tour the building to see this site (adding that to my Things to Do in Detroit list).

--There are more than 125 bars and restaurants within one square mile of downtown Detroit.

Saturday, I ate at six of them. I've only got a hundred more to go. Care to join me?

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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