Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Some Genuine Detroit 'School Pride'

Seven days ago, Detroit's Communication and Media Arts High School (CMA) was a struggling educational institution, symbolized by its aging exterior and deteriorating interior.

Friday morning, its students, alumni and neighbors got to see it transformed. Thanks to a NBC television series called, “School Pride,” CMA got a full renovation. For seven days, people poured money, time and – dare I be this melodramatic? – love into its bricks.

When the curtain fell, the school had a fresh, shiny look – instead of faded blue, it was a golden yellow and purple with sleek new signs. And from what I heard from the vendors, volunteers and media folks, the interior is just as stunning with all new technology and furnishings.

Perhaps the best part of watching the dramatic reveal (other than the buzzing helicopters ahead) was hearing DPS Emergency Manager Robert Bobb promise that he will never close CMA. The students cheered with a kind of manic energy that any television producer would dream of – and they meant it.

Some background: Housed in a building built in 1959, CMA was a candidate for closure in June due to its poor condition and the anticipated expense of repairs. Emergency Financial Manager Bobb learned the producers were looking for schools for the show and nominated CMA for a makeover. He removed it from the closure list after learning it was a finalist. So the drama was a bit staged but pretty awesome anyway.

“No matter how bad things get, they can get better,” cheered host Tom Stroup. “We showed up at just the right time. … You now have a brand-new school.” Cue the screaming. But it was legit; who wouldn't be geeked by such a sight?

It was cool to be on site when the whole reveal went down. Anyone else watch “Extreme Home Makeover” on ABC? Not to mention the competition so to speak, but I loved seeing the family's face when they realized how much their world would change thanks to the miracle makeover.

This show is even better, I think. It's about making a better educational experience for children. Yeah, it's all about the kids. And it's all about Detroit kids. Who deserve better. They deserve safe, well-built schools. They deserve a great school with top-notch technology. And now they have it.

The boom cameras, the beautiful hosts/television personalities, the hyped-up crowd – it was such a production. The vendors were buzzing just as much, eager to show off the products and services they donated. There was Logical Choice Technologies out of Georgia that brought massive tech support and products. Southfield-based Statewide Disaster Restoration, the onsite general contractor, donated more than $100,000 in hours and products. (Oh, and Just Baked – the cupcake gods – made sure the students got a sweet surprise when they went into their new lounge.)

Some 2,600 people agreed to volunteer during the seven-day renovation. One included a University of Michigan-Dearborn student who heard about over Facebook. There were community leaders like Daniel Mulligan, director of Project Seed, a top-notch mathematics programs. I could go on and on.

A small crowd gathered around the site, including Alicia Buggs, a CMA 1998 alumni. “I think it's wonderful,” she said, impressed with the new building.

I'll be truly impressed come October when the show finally airs. Sadly, all the production Friday did not allow the public or the press to see much of what the interior looks like. But the students know, and that's pretty much all that matters.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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