One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Detroit's Growing Artist Colonies

Because I'm in an artsy mood lately -- check out this story from The New York Times, which a realistic look at the challenges and opportunities here for artists. Opportunity: lotsa land. Challenge: Getting mugged and the resulting scar.

Highlight:

Brian Merkel, 25, is an arriviste from Portland, Ore.; he's been here since October. “I moved here blindly,” Mr. Merkel said. “I was an artist in Portland and I became more interested in food. I decided that when I moved here I would be a butcher. Within the first two weeks we had a charcuterie club.” People move to Detroit, he said, “because they have a sense of purpose.” That is true on a stretch of Farnsworth Street that has been reclaimed by artists and activists, a leafy block in eastern Detroit surrounded by severe blight. The Yes Farm, a communal building with a stage and a studio, beckons on a corner, even if it doesn't always have lights inside. Pickup soccer games happen on the empty lots at dusk. On a weekday evening Dutch artists in the middle of a two-month residency offered a talk on the sidewalk along with homemade fruit tarts.

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