Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser
One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

President Obama Comes To Detroit

President Barack Obama makes his way to the city today, mainly to tour a pair of auto plants and celebrate the success of his bailout strategy. That's nice, and I get the symbolism. And it's intriguing to think he may also have an opportunity to take a look at much of what lies between the two east-side factories, as has been poignantly noted. But even beyond this, even as he walks the factory floors and navigates the crumbling streets that connect the two plants, I have to hope that he also understands the deeper connection. I hope he understands how it's been over-reliance on that same symbolism in recent years, and the stasis it has induced, that have contributed to the despair and dilapidation that stretches between the Chrysler plant on Jefferson Ave. and the GM plant in Hamtramck.

Yes, the fact that there's still a pulse in the local auto industry is worth celebrating. But from what I read and hear, I get the sense that the symbolism that President Obama will be hailing today is more about his success in upholding a key element of Detroit's past than about helping set a course for our future. Sure, the companies that built those plants helped build this city. But their decline on these shores has also meant our decline. The jobs they once provided in abundance have dwindled. The work went away. So did many of the people. They were replaced by little more than creeping desolation.

Meanwhile, just like the once Big 3 suffered by staying mired in old business models and older-boy networks, the city they once made a power has lagged behind and stumbled onto hard times because of its inability to change. And we've gotten scant few public policies, from the White House or from City Hall, that have effectively addressed our plight.

I know President Obama has talked boldly about the future of manufacturing and technology in the U.S., about how the green revolution can replace the ones built on smoke and soot. I'm behind the brother there. Again, good-paying  jobs are always embraced here. But in this city, where unemployment is near 50 percent and where only a fraction of the people have college degrees, we need a vision for a relevant future, not just nods to our glorious past and sad present. Amid all the talk about aid to Wall Street and help for Main Street, we need the President to not forget real solutions for the Boulevard. The auto companies' recovery, however slight, hasn't been the city's. Although, in many ways, the fate of those companies and many in this town are still inextricably tied, it's becoming less so.

And in many ways, it needs to be. We're no longer the auto capital of the world. Worse, though, we're having a tough time figuring out who we should be instead. But we have to find a new direction, a new face, a new symbolism. I hope that the President is able to see that while he's here, too.

  • Print
  • Comment

Add Your Comment:

You must be logged in to post a comment.
The Detroit Blog Daily E-mail

Get e-mail updates from TIME's The Detroit Blog in your inbox and never miss a day.

 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser
 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

+ READ ARTICLE

When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser