Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Memoirs of a Very Homesick Globetrotting Detroiter: Part II

A follow-up to: Memoirs of a Very Homesick Globetrotting Detroiter: Part I

The main reason I am in Taiwan is to participate in a volunteer program called “AID Summer: Aiding Individuals with Disadvantages.” During the first training week, I was hopelessly homesick, lamenting the fact that my friends were back home in the Detroit area having unforgettable summer festivities in these months before we all start college. But I, the girl who has never won with raffle giveaways or scratch-off tickets, who is always last to get the BINGO, got lucky.

For the two-week stay, teaching elementary-level English, I have been dispatched to a group of islands off the west coast of Taiwan called Penghu.

My school is located on Xi-Yu island in Chih-Dong city, which is more of a village, with approximately 200 residents. Chih-Dong Elementary School has 51 students, 14 teachers, and one janitor. The city contains two pharmacies and one supermarket, and the closest chain food store is a McDonald's 30 minutes away in another town.

Penghu is known for its abundant fresh seafood. Try searching for a restaurant that doesn't sell oysters, and you might go to bed without dinner.

The real way to describe this small town, though, is through the land and its people. This place is beautiful in its simplicity.

At first, the change was tough. In Michigan, I was used to having an automatic washer and dryer, and consistent air-conditioning. I wasn't as mentally prepared as I should have been to combat insects and sidestep mounds of animal feces on the street. At the end of my first day here, I was drenched in sweat and itching all over.

Determined to make this a positive experience, I forced myself out of my comfort zone to explore the island. Waking up daily before 6 a.m., thanks to jet lag, I took long walks down the streets and sandbars of the town, camera ready. I found I was in an utterly beautiful place.

Being in the presence of such sights and sounds has inspired me to expand my pursuit of journalism, into photojournalism. Why hasn't everybody had the chance to see something as beautiful as this? How many more relatively unknown places like Penghu are there in the world?

This, I realized, is the reason journalism exists. Our planet is so full of breathtaking, inspiring places. And what would the world be without journalism to bring it to everyone? I want to make sure that no one misses out on these experiences, and I can do so by steadfastly pursuing this career.

Journalism can bring the big world to people with smaller opportunities. Journalism is here to stay and to bring the beauty of the world to everyone.

Emily Jan is part of the “TIME 11,” a group of Detroit area high-school students working with Assignment Detroit.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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