Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser
One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Unfiltered: Gionni Crawford on Being in the Pictures

Check that name at the top. Remember it. I have a feeling Gionni is going to make this state very proud.

I met Mr. Crawford a few months ago when I visited Youth Neighborhood News. He was crazy smart, clearly more poised than a kid his age (16!) should be and cute to boot. That helps a lot when you want to be in front of the camera. (Hey, there's a reason many of us write for a living.)

I asked the kids if they wanted to write a blog post...and Gionni did. Here's his take on the Michigan film industry -- and why it matters to him and so many others.

***

Cut and Print

By Gionni Crawford

The Michigan Film Office opened in 1979 and when the 42 percent film tax incentive passed it lured many more production companies to start making film and television shows here. I signed with Charlie's Talent Agency in December of 2009 and from then on I received a lot more insight on the depth and process of the film making industry here in Michigan.

My first production was in a Wayne State University Student Film written and directed by Kimberly Rice, where I played a supporting role. Now I am working on a TV series pilot. Since then multiple productions were based in Detroit and websites launched like Michigan Acting.com and FilmEmerge.com

One excellent thing about the film industry here is that they need all kinds of people and it's not a significantly large market. Roles are practically given to us compared to all of the starving artists in Los Angeles.

I hope the next governor will not adverse the film tax incentive because a lot of work has gone into training people and building film studios. Many people who not only be crestfallen, outraged and belligerent but most importantly thousands of jobs would be lost

The very first major motion picture that was created in Michigan is “This Time for Keeps” in 1946. More than 120 films and TV shows have been based here. Some films that are filming now are Ben Stiller's 30 Minutes or Less, Scream 4, Real Steel starring Hugh Jackman, and the Machine Gun Preacher.

My future college is here at the University of Michigan. They have an excellent theater program – it is one of the Top 10 in the nation.

One thing I can say to all of the people here who want to become actors is to network like crazy. The film industry won't stop for you so go and be an extra and go to networking events like film festivals and do non-paying student film work. It's tangible only if you do something about it.

***

  • Print
  • Comment

Add Your Comment:

You must be logged in to post a comment.
The Detroit Blog Daily E-mail

Get e-mail updates from TIME's The Detroit Blog in your inbox and never miss a day.

 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser
 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

+ READ ARTICLE

When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser