Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Detroit vs. Chicago: A Clear Winner

An Open Letter to the Residents of Chicago:

Hello, Windy City. I am inviting all of you to leave that normally lovely nirvana known as Chicago and move to Detroit.

Why? How about this: My city doesn't charge $50 for an expired parking meter. My family was THREE minutes late, and we earned this unbelievable high fee for violating your fair streets. My apologies, Chicago, but that's outrageous. My in-laws may love you, but I'm a little irked.

If you'll allow me to speak on behalf of Detroit, I'll give you a few reasons why you should move to the D. Our rush hour is really an hour, not 24/7. We have real UM and MSU bars, not replicas. We have the original Coney dog, not replicas. For the price of a small, narrow condo with no yard or garage in your city, you could get a mansion anywhere from downtown Detroit to Birmingham to Grosse Pointe Shores. Hell, I'll even park your car at night if you make the move. And our parking tickets cost a measly $5. Granted, the job situation isn't the best. But we're working on it.

Love, Karen

P.S. Jump to the break for some Links of the Week.

--The New York Times adds its two cents to the “ruin porn” debate and does a feature on Design 99, the famous (or infamous) project that got publicity for its $100 house purchase. The article says and comments on a lot more, including the Heidelberg Project.

--Model D jumps in on another Mitch Cope and Gina Reichert project, this time in Hamtramck. It is called Popps Packing, and there are a lot of other (soon-to-be famous) people participating. I'm going to try to get by this one to check it out.

--NPR also contributes to the abandoned building issue in the Takeaway. It links to a bunch more articles far better than I could. Well worth the read. Here is my favorite line:

As Thomas Morton points out, reporters often pair stories about the struggling Big Three with photos of the Packard Auto Plant in east Detroit. The problem? That plant closed in 1956, when the American automakers were still thriving.

--I don't know a lot about this project, “Burn,” but it sounds interesting. The filmmakers are focusing on Detroit firefighters and they are asking for support. That means throwing some money their way. Here is a 10-minute preview of the project.

--Really interesting read from Wayne State University Prof. Jerry Herron about what it is like to live around and in the city of Detroit. He too has faced the “Wow, Detroit is a real city?” dilemma. How exactly are you supposed to answer that?

--Just for fun, and because I mentioned Coneys, some footage from Becks over at Detroit Moxie of when Michael Symon was in town to film the hot-dog war television show.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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