Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

A GreenWay Runs Through It

Picture it: A plain gray slab of concrete, perhaps four foot wide. It's large enough for a couple to walk side by side or a couple of kids to race along. It's surrounded by trees, a green field and two newly constructed playgrounds.

This is not a scene out of Rochester Hills, Bloomfield Township or Birmingham. It's within the city of Detroit. It's called a greenway, and it will link some of the D's greatest assets: Its people, neighborhoods and cultural centers.

Recently, I met with the Tom Woiwode, director of the GreenWays Initiative for the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan. We took a tour of this project, which is connecting the city, Mexicantown, Corktown and part of Dearborn's Salina business district. It is one of the first projects these groups have ever worked on together. And, chances are, it won't be the last.

As Woiwode notes: Urban landscapes need to be people-friendly. That is how you will get people to stick around…and more families to move in.

“It's always been about the community,” Woiwode emphasized. “You start connecting these groups, and you'll connect the community.”

Woiwode and I met at Patton Recreation Center to tour the GreenWay that will join Detroit and Dearborn. Its official name is Southwest Detroit/Dearborn Greenway or the Rouge River Gateway Link. Yes, there will be signs there to help identify it as the project grows (at least through 2012).

It is a bike path, walking trail, outdoor recreation area and more wrapped up in one long cement stretch. Yes, some might say it is a glorified sidewalk. But it is something for the residents to enjoy and be proud of for years to come.

“This is an attempt to make this neighborhood more attractive to residents and businesses,” Woiwode said.

I can just see the teens meandering, the tots running, the newlyweds strolling. A walkway like this makes you slow down, talk to neighbors about their lawn. The kids get to play together. As a young mother, I loved a smooth path to cruise the stroller along; meeting other people was a saving grace then – and it still is now.

Some background: The Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan was founded in 1984 as a permanent community endowment, built with gifts from hundreds of individuals and organizations committed to a strong future for southeast Michigan. Since its founding 25 years ago, the Community Foundation has distributed more than $390 million in more than 34,000 grants to charitable projects in southeast Michigan's seven-county area.

The Community Foundation's GreenWays Initiative is a five-year program to fund the design and construction of greenways, provide training and technical support to organizations, agencies and municipalities that were undertaking greenways development and raise public awareness about the benefits greenways bring to local communities.

The GreenWays Initiative has been linking the communities of the local seven-county region. This $15 million non-profit program has served as a means to assist communities, many that have never worked together before, in financing the development of greenways. The program has even been cited as a national model for other communities.

The concept begins along Detroit's riverfront and over the course of years, will connect the region with miles of these trails. Since its inception, grants have been awarded by the Community Foundation for projects that, when completed, will have been used to acquire more than 575 acres of land, construct more than 100 miles of greenways and link 80 different cities and towns to neighboring communities.

For example, the organization is a major contributor to the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy's Riverwalk project, which extends a total of 4.7 miles, providing Detroiters with beautiful spaces for enjoying their city outdoors. Other projects include the Dequindre Cut, which is in the process of linking to Detroit's riverfront and to its farmers market – The Eastern Market. A trail that follows the Rouge River links the University of Michigan-Dearborn campus, Henry Ford Community College and other landmarks together.

Let's face it: Detroit doesn't have the money to do a lot of this work right now. And there is plenty of land available. It's a great way for the community to get the green spaces it needs; a so-called “real city” demands it.

“If you view this as a collection of sidewalks, I would agree. But you also could think of it as a way to knit the community together and revitalize neighborhoods. That's a different conversation, and it's one the Community Foundation wants to have,” Woiwode said.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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