Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

The Greatest, Forgotten Season in Sports History

This year marks the 75th anniversary of possibly the greatest season in sports history. The season belonged to Detroit. And most people forgot all about it. Well, except for 32-year-old Charles Avison, a Detroiter dedicating his career to bringing back the legacy.

First, the untouchable season: In 1935, the Detroit Tigers, Lions and Red Wings won their first championships. Joe Louis went from unknown amateur to international champion; thousands of people nationwide literally danced in the streets after his fights. Detroit was home to champions of diving, golf, sprinting, softball, skeet shooting, billiards, badminton and even checkers. Detroit even had the “Babe Ruth of Speed Boat Racing,” Gar Wood, whose races would bring crowds of up to 600,000 to the Detroit River. Michigan's governor and the Detroit City Council proclaimed April 18 as “Champions Day” for Detroit. The media called Detroit “City of Champions.” No other city has achieved such feats.

Five years ago, Avison first learned of 1935's greatness after finding a brief mention of it in a Tigers statistics guide. As a lifelong Detroit sports fan and history buff, Avison marveled at his discovery. It changed his life. He tried to learn more, but found minimal resources. With old newspaper clippings as his primary source of information, Avison began learning all about the period when, he says, Detroit sports were born.

The good news? “Nobody has taken the ‘City of Champions' title,” according to Avison, “It's still there–we've just forgotten about it,” he said. Avison believes many people chose to toss Depression-era memories, including those of 1935's victories, and concentrate on moving forward after World War II. His full-time job is making sure nobody forgets again. He wants to give people something positive to associate with Detroit. “All I've got is my conviction that this story can bring a positive benefit to not only Detroit, but Michigan, as well,” he said. Avison also feels responsibility to honor the teams involved and provide resources on this deep vein of history.

Avison started his own publishing company, Diomedea, to publish books on this era. He wrote one himself, Detroit: City of Champions, which was published last year, and is working on another. He travels Michigan, informing people of Detroit's standing title and trying to bring back Champions Day as an annual event. And he wants to do it now. “If it is not relevant enough to bring back the story for the 75th anniversary, when will it be relevant?” Avison asked. “Do we have to wait for the 100th anniversary, when the memories are even more faded?”

Coincidentally, the 1935 season happened during the Great Depression, a time when many believed Detroit was hit hardest. “In the middle of the Depression, this season gave the city something that no other city could give its fans,” said Avison. Despite the city's current struggles, he believes this history gives Detroiters something they can still hold onto: pride. “Detroit's already lost enough of its former grandeur. This is one thing that cannot be taken,” he said. “Because even if another city does win three national championships in one season, who are you going to put up against Joe Louis?” Touché, Mr. Avison. So, fans of Detroit Sports and Detroit City, take heart. We have plenty of problems. But we are still Detroit, City of Champions.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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