Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Why I'm Going into Journalism: It Has a Future

When I first told my parents that I wanted to be a journalist, they thought I was crazy. At the time, newspapers were beginning to go up for sale or go out of business altogether, and many people considered journalism to be dead. My mom understood that writing was something that I loved to do, but couldn't fathom why I would want to go to school for a career that would be so difficult to succeed in. She thought I should be a p.r. person for a major company or a copy editor for aspiring novelists, but I said that wasn't what I wanted.

My father, who is a writer himself, worried that I would struggle to make ends meet, since it was a difficult process for him when he freelanced. I was stubborn, though. I vowed not only to get into journalism, but to write for a national publication.

Over the past few years, people have raised their eyebrows at me when I tell them what I want to do. Even reporters have told me to think about doing something else. But they're even more surprised when I say that I have no reservations about going into this field because it's not dying, merely changing.

Some newspapers and news organizations may be shutting down, but others are being created online. Papers that are geared toward a specific niche aren't taking much of a hit at all. Readers are looking for something different, and the publications that are mixing things up seem to retain their consumers. Whether that means incorporating new interactive multimedia into the mix, or spicing up the design on the front page, journalism is changing because it must.

But that doesn't mean that it's going away. In fact, it's obvious that people are hungrier for information than ever. We just have to figure out the best way to present that information to the public.

Maybe it's an overused defense, but when people try to tell me that newspapers will be obsolete in a few years, I simply bring up radio's continued existence. After color TV became a mass medium, many Americans thought the radio would begin to disappear, yet it remains in every automobile sold today. And while online news sites are becoming more prominent, newspapers will be around for as long as people want to hold physical paper in their hand— which, I think, will be forever.

I wouldn't exactly describe myself as an optimist, but I'm not worried about the future of journalism or my future in it. The changes just make me work harder. I know that I have to be even more competitive to get internships and be well-versed in many aspects of the field. But I believe I can do all these things because it's something I love to do, which means I won't settle for anything less.

Liz Sawyer, one of 11 high school students working with Time, Inc.'s Assignment Detroit project, has been chosen to give the commencement address to her high-school classmates at Waterford Kettering. She plans to attend Syracuse University in the fall.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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