Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser
One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Is Bat-Wielding Detroit Principal Right Or Wrong?

Read a provocative piece in the Freep's Opinion section that offered a harsh take on Kenyetta Wilbourn, the 4-foot-11-inch, bat-wielding principal at one of Detroit's most-troubled high schools. Where others have lauded Wilbourn for her tough approach to maintaining school discipline — comparing her to Joe Clark, the bat-toting administrator made famous in the movie Lean On Me — DPS parent and businesswoman Mari Hadley was unflinchingly critical...

As a result, Denby High School students may venture out into the world with the perception that as a child it is not appropriate to use violence, but as an adult it is appropriate to utilize a bat to terrorize other individuals. Wilbourn's behavior is inappropriate because it violates the school code of conduct, promotes violence, is a form of child abuse and, most of all, is illegal.

A lot of people are sure to dismiss Hadley's remarks as the criticisms of a soft-headed liberal refusing to accept the harsh realities that educators like Wilbourn have to cope with. But considering she's a parent with a child in that same system, Hadley's probably at least as qualified as any other pundit to talk about the challenges in the system.

At the same time, I respect that the diminutive Wilbourn is hell-bent on protecting herself in those Denby hallways. Teachers and administrators should never have to work in fear.

But here's my question: If you're a principal at a big-city high school, backed by the full authority of DPS and the state, and you feel the need to carry a weapon, how do you tell powerless children who walk not only those halls but also the streets outside them that they shouldn't arm themselves as well?

I have bright young cousins who attend Denby High School. One of them was shot in the back by some fake neighborhood tough guys about a year or so ago. His brother, a former Denby student, just missed being shot in the head. In spite of what happened, and as much as I love my cousins and want them safe, I still don't ever want them, or any other kid, walking around with a pistol. Or a knife. Or a bat.

But if it's justifiable for his principal to grab a bat to walk among children, to make it back home to her own family safely at day's end, why shouldn't my cousin — and each one of his classmates who've ever felt the sting of a bullet (and that's more than we care to think, trust me) — tuck aluminum, or better yet iron, into their own waistbands?

Hadley argues that Wilbourn may give students the impression that violence among kids isn't okay, while violence from adults is. But I don't think it's just that. I think an equally compelling issue is how, given the overwhelming reality of bloodshed in their schools and on their blocks, we realistically expect these kids to respond to violence from any quarter.

Again, I understand that the principal, whom I hear is a very solid administrator, has her concerns. And I know that they are as real as the gunshot wound on my little cousin's back.

But if the adults in charge are arming themselves to move among schoolkids, how legitimately can we demand that those frightened, angry and endangered schoolkids not do the same?

  • Print
  • Comment

Add Your Comment:

You must be logged in to post a comment.
The Detroit Blog Daily E-mail

Get e-mail updates from TIME's The Detroit Blog in your inbox and never miss a day.

 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser
 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

+ READ ARTICLE

When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser