Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Update on the News: Detroit's Spasm of Violence

New developments in the case of Aiyana Stanley Jones, the 7-year-old girl fatally shot by Detroit police early Sunday:

The chief prosecutor of Wayne County, Mich., which includes Detroit, announced Wednesday that Chauncey Louis Owens, 34, has been charged in the fatal shooting of Jerean Blake, a 17-year-old high school senior. It was Blake's killing, last Friday, that led police to search for Owens at the two-story white house where Aiyana lived with her grandmother.

The precise relationship between Owens and Blake is unclear. The authorities say that about 2:45 p.m. Friday, the men argued in a hardscrabble neighborhood on Detroit's East Side. Owens allegedly left, but returned a few minutes later and shot Blake, who was standing outside a grocery store with his girlfriend. The boy, police say, stumbled across the street, collapsed and died.

The violence erupted May 3, when five Detroit police officers were shot, one fatally, while investigating a reported break-in at an abandoned building. Then, on May 12, a 69-year-old grandmother cooking dinner was killed by a stray bullet from a man apparently defending himself from a carjacker. All of this comes as Detroit officials have touted a drop in violent crime.

Tension remains high in Detroit, a city with a long history of bloody conflicts between police and civilians. Congressman John Conyers, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, has asked U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to investigate Detroit's spasm of violence. Michigan Gov. Jennifer M. Granholm called Aiyana's death "a complete and total tragedy," the Detroit Free Press reports. The mayor of Detroit, Dave Bing, and his police chief, Warren Evans, have expressed sympathy about Sunday's incident. The mayor has also criticized Geoffrey Feiger, the attorney who has filed a lawsuit on behalf of Aiyana's family, for “taking advantage of a terrible situation,” according to the Free Press. Meanwhile, the Rev. Al Sharpton is expected to deliver Aiyana's eulogy on Saturday.

UPDATE 2: Earlier today, the Detroit City Council voted to cut the police department's budget by $6.5 million, or roughly 2%. The Free Press' Naomi R. Patton reports:

The council is expected to deliver the budget to Mayor Dave Bing by Friday. It determined that the Police Department, which amounts to 42% of the city's budget, could longer be spared from budget cuts. Cuts were also applied to the $144 million allocated to the Detroit Fire Department in Bing's budget.

“This is the toughest decision that I've made since I've been here,” Council President Pro Tem Gary Brown, former Detroit deputy police chief, said before initially proposing a 4%, $13 million cut from Bing's recommended $248 million budget allocation for police. “I recommend that we have to find a way to make the cut without impacting officers on patrol.”

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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