Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Deep Thoughts on Fixing Up Detroit

Dear City of Detroit:

I hope you enjoy the $170 I contributed to your general fund this week in the form of two payments: $10 for a parking ticket and $160 for my traffic ticket. While I admit responsibility for my traffic error, the parking ticket was a raw deal (you need to fix the meters outside of YouthVille; really, I put in two different credit cards, and your high-tech system rejected them both.)

Don't spend the money all in one place. If I may, I'd like my funds to go toward the rightsizing effort. You can pretend all you want about backing off this plan; you and I both know it is the right thing. But I agree that you do need more citizen participation, so I dig your efforts to relaunch the project.

Love,
Me

Now, onto the real business of the day. Some good reads for your Detroit-obsessed brains:

  • Detroit's “renewed sense of purpose” gets a shout out in Architect magazine. Blog favorite Michael Poris is included in the story, which focuses on the efforts to clean up our horseless town.
  • Well-deserved tribute to Phil Cooley of Slows Bar BQ in The Detroit News. This is the kind of energy we need if Detroit stands a chance. (Do you sometimes feel like all of the enthusiasm for the city found in some media is just a way to get us all pumped up and maybe off our fat Midwestern duffs?)
  • Fun new blog from Norm Silk, one of the two wonderful men who are restoring the Frank Lloyd Wright house in Detroit. I'm truly enjoying the bloggers on Metro Mode, and Silk has a nice flavor to his writing. Here's my favorite line: “Make Detroit the city you want to live in.”
  • Fun piece in the Detroit Free Press about how Detroit's cultural organizations are collaborating and collectively keeping us cool. One of my hopes for this blog is to show the collaboration theme across the many groups here, so I loved this piece.
  • Great story by former Metro Times editor Ron Williams on AlterNet about what he sees happening in the city, especially is potential sustainability movement efforts (including urban gardens). He takes Time magazine to task as well for its decision to publish those ruin photos. My favorite line: “DO NOT underestimate the capacity of this city to achieve great things.”
  • Old news, but still great stuff: NPR's The Takeaway let Detroiters talk about what they love about the city (in the wake of the much-maligned Dateline piece. Really, Outside World, we do not eat raccoons on a regular basis.)
  • For those interested in urban farming, check out this great article in Crain's Detroit by Wayne Law Review survey editor Sarah Kwiatkowski and my favorite professor, John Mogk, about the potential here for going green in Detroit.
  • I missed this piece, but it is worth finding (or buying on Amazon) called Regional Roots: The Birth and Evolution of Detroit and Its People. It was produced by One of Us Films and the Detroit Orientation Institute. Here is the preview of it if you want to get a taste of what you'll see. If I can find the whole video, I'll post it here.
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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

+ READ ARTICLE

When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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