Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Q&A: Cassandra Jones-McBryde on Lifting Up Detroit Youth

When there is a need, Detroiters step up and fill it.

Whether it is hunger (Forgotten Harvest), homelessness (Detroit Central City) or financial strife (SAFE), it seems like there are always people ready to help another Detroiter. Some big cities may brag about how unaffected their residents are by one another; I'd argue Detroit can brag about how much we watch out for each other.

Meet Stephanie Penn-Danforth and Cassandra Jones-McBryde. They are the co-founders of the Pretty Girl Project, a non-profit organization that empowers girls ages 12-17 to embrace their inner and outer beauty.

Next week, the two will host their second event aimed at Detroit youth, helping them prepare themselves for not only one of their biggest nights as a teen – prom – but for presenting themselves to the world as soon-to-be high-school graduates.

Through their friends and industry connections, Penn-Danforth and Jones-McBryde collected nearly 300 dresses for Detroit-area girls. The goal was to help these young women attend their prom when their families otherwise could not afford to do it. In fact, they collected so many dresses, shoes and accessories that they need more girls to sign up for the free event, which features information on etiquette, ballroom-style dancing, hair and age-appropriate makeup application.

For background: Penn-Danforth is a graduate of Detroit Public Schools and editor of Daily Venus Diva, a plus-size eMagazine. Jones-McBryde is co-owner of The Fuller Woman Inc. and U.S. Director of the International Fuller Woman Expo. So both women know something about fashion, women's psyches and beauty.

Jones-McBryde took a few minutes to chat with me about the project, prom and how much love she has for Detroit.

Q: What kind of response have you had to your prom project?
A: I'd go into work and find an email from someone saying they had 20 dresses for us and I'd have to go and hide to cry. The response has been overwhelming. We have received close to 300 dresses from people across the country who want to assist girls in the Detroit area. We are now in a unique position to gift to more girls than we ever dreamed we could. … These are beautiful dresses; we've even got some couture ones like Vera Wang. We have some really high-profile designers who specially made dresses or donated some from their personal collections. So they really are something these girls can be proud of. We also have more than 30 volunteers who will act as the girls' personal stylists that day.

Q: Why focus on the prom?
A: It's so overlooked. That dress, that dance, that day may not seem important when you look at the whole scheme of a family trying to survive. But we know that it is one of the most important days in a young woman's life. … We've focused on high schools like the Catherine Ferguson Academy, where teens are learning to be parents and raising children. The counselors there told us these girls already feel out of place because of their situation. They want to be a part of this high-school experience. … We've gotten (volunteers and donations) from women who told us they were unable to go to prom, and they wanted to see other girls get to fulfill their dreams.

Q: What is the goal for the event?
A: We want to teach these girls to feel good about themselves. It's about loving yourself and knowing your value. Everyone deserves to feel beautiful for at least one day. You get to dress up like you want and to feel like a princess. But it is about more than that; it also is a celebration of who they are. These are teen moms, teens living in shelters. They are going to be graduating seniors and that should be celebrated. That says a lot about them and their strengths.

Q: What is your takeaway about Detroit and the support this city has based on what you've seen so far?
A: We take care of the people we live around. We support one another. (As a businesswoman), I want to make Detroit a focus for business, to bring other businesses here. We want people to know Detroit is the place to be and they should make the pilgrimage here. We just need to get them here and then we've got the rest.

The event runs from 1-6 p.m. Saturday, April 24, at Focus: HOPE's Center for Advanced Technologies in Detroit. For more information, go to the Pretty Girl Project web site.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

+ READ ARTICLE

When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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