Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Right Time for Metro Detroit?

I'm seeing some synergy today. Some good news about the city, the suburbs and all of that:

* Saab Cars is putting its North America headquarters in Royal Oak. The former division of General Motors Corp. is now owned by Dutch luxury automaker Spyker Cars NV. The city gave Saab a property tax break, and the Michigan Economic Growth Authority gave the company a $1.2 million, five-year employment tax credit to get the deal done. Come news to come on this today as Gov. Jenny Granholm holds a press conference. A highlight:

Its headquarters would house sales and marketing operations, advertising, technical assistance and customer support along with possibly parts testing and vehicle evaluations. Other operations based in Royal Oak would include human resources, accounting, IT, legal and clerical staff. Eventually, distribution for Canada and Mexico could be based out of Royal Oak. Saab is prepared to invest about $2.4 million and create up to 60 jobs over the next five years. The jobs would pay an average $1,693 a week.

Nice words out of Mike Colleran, chief operating officer of Saab Cars North America as noted by The Detroit News:

"There are great suppliers here, and the human resources here are second to none," he said.

* Model D has a nice Q&A with Matt Cullen, who heads the M-1 Rail project. A highlight of his thoughts on why the right people are in the mix on this transportation innovation:

This is the right group of assembled leadership. From the private sector, we have (Robert) Penske, (Dan) Gilbert and myself, and from the governmental community, we have Mayor Bing, (Wayne County Executive Bob) Ficano, (Governor) Granholm ... right up to the federal branch. From the foundation community, we've got Rip Rapson from Kresge, the Ford Foundation supporting transit-oriented development, and we're talking to a number of other foundations. It's a coalition of folks getting their heads around this and, to use a train analogy, once it gets moving, gets momentum, it's difficult for people to stand in front of it. I analogize it to the riverfront: it's a pretty similar process, you get the right people in the room and are inclusive in the process, get people enthusiastic about it, and you can get things done.

* The New York Times drops in again to comment on the downsizing project. The author adds some thoughtful words of warning:

If Mayor Bing tries to do too much, too quickly, without giving enough to the residents who have to move, then right-sizing will justly be seen as yet another example of the public insensitivity and folly that has unfortunately marred too many past efforts at dealing with urban distress.

The comments section of this article is a great read as well; people seem truly interested in this "project" and whether it has potential to bring back the city's greatness.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

+ READ ARTICLE

When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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