Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

A Rant, and a Call to Rally

Hello, my name is Karen. And I'm a Facebook addict.

That being said, I am amazed at how much can be communicated in just a few words on this social-networking site. (As an aside, can we remove those two words – social networking – from the English language?) Even status updates are a kind of poetry when in the right hands.

An awesome former co-worker's conversation string about the Michigan Central Station created an interesting comment I wanted to share. Her friend noted: “How sad the state of the building & the state of Detroit. Wish it would rally!!!!”

The part I like, and you can tell it is because I'm a lover of words, is the idea of rallying around the city. Get out your dictionaries, kiddies:

Rally: verb. To bring into order again; gather and organize or inspire anew: The general rallied his scattered army. 2. to draw or call (persons) together for a common action or effort: He rallied his friends to help him. 3. to concentrate or revive, as one's strength, spirits, etc.: They rallied their energies for the counterattack.

Damn straight. Let's rally.

It's like when some 5,200 people get together to support the Detroit Public Schools through the Reading Corps. (Yeah, that's how high the volunteer count is now.) Or when more than 10,000 people “friend” the Detroit Declaration on Facebook. Or even when a single person picks up a piece of trash off of Belle Isle, chooses to eat at a downtown restaurant or keeps watch over the homes in their neighborhood as part of an Angel's Night activity.

Enough whining. Enough despair over things past. Enough pessimism. End the conversations about city versus surburbs. Rally. Don't you feel the grass-roots movements gaining momentum? Don't you see the younger generations taking interest in Detroit? Anyone taken note of the small-businesses popping up everywhere? Has anyone noticed the outcroppings of people walking around downtown, taking over the neighborhoods? Just a few years ago, you could shoot a cannon down Woodward, Jefferson, Lafayette and not hit a thing. Not now.

It's not about giant leaps; it's about baby steps. It's about an attitude. As Mayor Bing says: “If you are here at 8 a.m., you are late.”

So, Detroit, for all of our sakes, rally.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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