Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Sparking a New Conversation

Heading downtown this weekend (again) to check out some sights and sounds. My first stop: the Black Business Festival at the Russell Bazaar.

The Festival, which runs Saturday and Sunday, is aimed at entrepreneurs at all stages of development. Last year, its inaugural event drew more than 3,000 people, eager for its mix of seminars, panel discussions and entertainment. So you can learn how to do your taxes and the Hustle all in one weekend.

I'm particularly interested in hearing what keynote speaker Detroit City Council President Charles Pugh has to say. His Saturday evening remarks will highlight the city's economic outlook to this large and likely receptive audience of business owners and operators.

The event also highlights the Russell Bazaar and Russell Industrial Center, a business incubator and shopping extravaganza all rolled into one. I've yet to boogie myself out to see this development of stores, restaurants and art galleries (I can almost taste Niki's Pizza now) so I'm ready to check it out.

“Entrepreneurship will usher in Detroit's renaissance,” said Lisa Eberhardt, social media marketing intern for doDetroit, which is helping to promote the festival. “And this event is the perfect way for business owners to jumpstart or continue to grow their business.”

Organizers including Jodie Svagr have boosted the festival's offerings this year, adding a strong educational element to the mix. There's a panel on starting and growing your business in Detroit. There are seminars on everything from finding interns to marketing insights to tax accounting. Speakers range from Pugh to the International Detroit Black Expo and TechTown. Networking is also a key component to this year's event, said Svagr, who handles events, promotions and development for the Russell Industrial Center and Bazaar. Thus, there will be lots of time to get people together to talk about their common issues.

The Festival is designed to bring new business to Detroit, to offer a free, family-friendly event to the public and to highlight Black History Month, Svagr said. The Russell Bazaar also is providing 100 table spaces for local business owners to advertise promote and network.

“The goal behind this whole event is to get conversations started,” Svagr said.

FYI: The whole thing is free. The Russell Bazaar is located at 1600 Clay in Detroit. It is the Motown version of European marketplace, housed within a converted Albert Kahn factory. Most weekends, it has about 150 vendors, who have rented booths within the 60,000-square-foot facility. So come back often!

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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