Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Volunteers and Pink Slips

As part of Assignment Detroit, TIME.com is working with 11 high school students from the Detroit area. They come from all walks of life, from suburban prep schools to city schools both strong and weak. The project will illustrate the Detroit region from their point of view—what it's like to live there now, and whether the area has a place in their future or not. Today's post is from Dan Dou, a junior at Grosse Pointe South High School in suburban Detroit.

Last month, I e-mailed the local Beaumont Hospital in Grosse Pointe, Mich., about being a volunteer. Several friends at my high school had done this and, since I am considering a major in medicine, I wanted to try it. I was accepted.

After setting up an orientation with the hospital's student program coordinator, I got an e-mail saying the appointment had been rescheduled due to "unforeseen circumstances." When I went to the hospital's Web site to get a reference form, it wasn't there. Instead, I found a page saying that student volunteering had been suspended until further notice. So, I e-mailed the coordinator. A form e-mail came back telling me that someone would be in touch.

Someone from the hospital called and rescheduled the orientation. That's where we were told the student coordinator had been laid off and that the hospital would not be accepting any more volunteers. Beaumont Head of Volunteer Services Beth Frydlewicz said that the hospital system had been forced to reorganize its volunteer program, eliminating four student program coordinators to cut payroll and refocus resources.

Like many Michigan businesses, the hospital is having budget problems. Beaumont's CEO has said the hospital is seeing more people who don't have adequate insurance or who are on Medicaid and Medicare. There is a credit crunch. And patients are delaying elective surgery, which brings in money.

So, construction projects have been delayed, hundreds have been laid off and the hospital has stopped accepting student volunteers. I am one of the last two high school students allowed to volunteer. I have told the people at Beaumont that I would like to work in the emergency room, but college students usually do that. It sounds like I may be assigned to a post called "a patient escort." I don't have my start date yet. But feel lucky that I got in.

As companies throughout metropolitan Detroit, and across the country, cut costs, opportunities for high schoolers to gain experience are being restricted. Losing the chance to volunteer is just an inconvenience compared to the pain of having a paid job vanish. But my near-miss shows how Detroit's turmoil is beginning to affect the lives of many, from city-dwellers to suburbanites, from the young to the old.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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