Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Give the Working Class a Break

As part of Assignment Detroit, TIME.com is working with 11 high school students from the Detroit area. They come from all walks of life, from suburban prep schools to city schools both strong and weak. The project will illustrate the Detroit region from their point of view—what it's like to live there now, and whether the area has a place in their future or not. Today's post is from Liz Sawyer, a senior at Waterford Kettering High School in suburban Detroit.

My mother has been a waitress at Big Boy for more than 20 years. During that time she has worked as hard as she possibly can to provide for our family. And until recently, that was enough. But on more than one occasion in the past few months, regular customers have made degrading comments toward my mother and her job. When a customer asked about me, she said that I had just won a scholarship. He replied, “So your daughter is a success, despite you? I bet she doesn't want to end up working here.”

It takes a special kind of audacity to say that to someone's face.

What I can't understand, though, is why being a waitress is so utterly repulsive. My mother makes a living serving the public, just as so many other Americans do. She makes almost $500 a week with wages and tips. No, she didn't dream of becoming a waitress as a child, but over the years she has stayed in order to put food on our table. Seems like an honorable profession to me.

Besides, every mother is a waitress in one way or another. Most mothers cater to their family's wants and needs; it just so happens that my mother caters to everyone's needs.

Even more foreign to me is the elitist attitude. Who is this man to judge my mother's career choice, when so many of the people here can't find work? With the decline of the auto industry, people in Metro Detroit are lucky to even have a part-time job, let alone full-time. People with bachelor's degrees are getting turned away from McDonald's. And it doesn't look like it's going to get better soon.

The truth is, the working class drives this city, it doesn't hold it back. We shouldn't be ashamed of those blue-collar workers who spend their lives making ours a little more comfortable or a little less complicated; we should be grateful.

I'm the way I am because of my mother, not despite her.  


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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

+ READ ARTICLE

When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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