Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Detroit through the Crystal Ball

Rebecca Rosen has a good feeling about Detroit.

Normally, that wouldn't mean much coming from a working-class mom of two. But Rosen is a psychic medium with insights to the Other Side. (No, we're not talking about Eight Mile).

Granted, this blog post is not your typical, weighty “Time magazine is going to change Detroit” fodder. But it is good to know the spirit world is on our side.

“Detroit's already hit rock bottom, and that's good because we can rebuild,” Rosen told me this week. “We'll be moving forward by 2012.”

Did you read that? 2012! Things are manifesting, Rosen said. Doors are opening. Change is in the works. Life is going to get better. Set your calendar for good times ahead.

Now, I'm not saying you have to take Rosen's word for it. No, she didn't add anything specific about light rail, massive infrastructure work or better school test scores. And I know there are going to be those people out there who think I'm a kook just for taking the blog in this direction. But it's Friday. We all need a little fun.

And I find it fascinating that Rosen would have any feelings about Detroit or its future.

Normally, she would not use her skills to ponder a city's fate, her public relations folks told me. Still, Rosen has a connection to the state's past. Although she was born in Nebraska, Rosen began her spiritual career here in Michigan. In fact, she is so widely known in Metro Detroit that she is starting her nationwide book tour here on Monday. If you cannot make that event, check her out on Nightline, which also airs Monday.

Some background: Rosen began doing public readings about 10 years ago at a coffee shop in West Bloomfield. A Detroit Jewish News article in 2001 spring boarded her to massive success. As bookings increased, she soon moved with her new husband to an office in Royal Oak. (From there, they were through California on their way to Denver, where they now reside with their little boys).

Rosen discovered her talent while in college. After suffering a depression and eating disorder, Rosen said she began to receive messages from her grandmother, who had died years before. Grandma Babe had committed suicide, and she wanted to prevent Rebecca from going down that path. Rosen eventually began sharing her skills with others, and that's how she ended up in the DJN, one of the mostly widely read newspapers in Detroit. Her business took off like a shot.

She's been on Entertainment Tonight and the Rachel Ray show. She's done readings for dozens of celebrities including Vanna White and Jennifer Aniston. (Did she know about Brad Pitt? Never mind.) There's even talk about her developing a TV show of her own.

All of this (including my interview) is due in part to Rosen's new book, “Spirited: Connect to the Guides All Around You,” hits bookshelves Feb. 2. It too has some lessons for Detroit, Rosen said. She believes our fate is not set; rather, we can have an impact on what happens in our lives if we trust ourselves and our intuition.

Rosen points to Tom Smallwood, the Saginaw bowling champion, as an example. The former General Motors worker who was laid off from his job asked his wife for a little time to achieve his dream of becoming a real, full-time bowler. Last month, against all odds and a shaky hand, he won the Professional Bowling Association's top prize.

Smallwood's story should be an inspiration for everyone in the region, Rosen said, because he “found the good in life and channeled his energy toward the positive.”

“It's never too late to recreate,” Rosen added.

So Detroit has a chance? Yup, the psychic medium said.

Take her advice seriously, people. She normally has a three-year waiting list. And a private, one-hour session with Rosen would cost the city $500 or more, and that's money we don't have to spare.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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