Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Finding the Bad Guy

A few days ago, I caught a television show called, “Apocalypse Man,” on the History Channel. Hosted by armed-forces vet and martial-artist Rudy Reyes, the show attempted to teach viewers how to survive a Doom's Day situation – how to find food, water and shelter without getting eaten by aliens or so lonely you start talking to a volleyball.

The background was truly desperate: Bombed out, decaying buildings, ransacked houses, cracked cement streets with trees shooting out of them. It looked like a true Apocalypse happened there.

The show, as you may have guessed by now, was filmed in Metro Detroit.

Every worthwhile story, I frequently tell my young son, has a good guy and a bad guy.

Later, I wondered…who is the bad guy in Detroit's story?

Some may say the mayor, citing Coleman Young or Kwame Kilpatrick as examples. Their seemingly self-centered administrations brought the city endless grief – and we'll be paying for their hubris for generations to come.

There are many who would name the City Council, the Board of Education, those in the boardrooms across the region who decided to leave the city and never look back at the chaos they caused.

Others say the guilt does not belong to a single person or group. Rather, it is the city's long-term issues. Racism. Isolationism. Disregard for human dignity.

As I have said before, Assignment Detroit has me thinking much more about Detroit than I ever have. And there are so many, many bad guys. But can you blame a single individual for what happened to this city over the past half century? Probably not. It would make for a better story to tell my kid, I suppose, if you could.

One thing I believe the Blog should do is give some history or background on Detroit to those who wade through it on a regular basis. According to the kind folks at Time Inc., about 60 percent of the Blog's readership is from outside of the state. Some of these generous souls may be former residents, curious to see what's new in the city as well as take a few walks down memory lane.

To be fair, then, let's say half of the readers are not from Detroit, Southeast Michigan or anywhere else in the state. How do you explain Detroit's long, drawn-out downfall to these people? There is no blog post, no magazine article, no clever YouTube video that can fully answer the question. Heck, even I'd like to figure out what evil created this mess.

There is no Bad Guy...What do you think?

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

+ READ ARTICLE

When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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