Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Remembering One of Detroit's She-roes

Rest In Peace, Mother...

Even before Coleman Young's first mayoral election made him the father of a new kind of politics in Detroit, Erma Henderson had already begun giving birth.

In 1972, two years before Young was elected mayor, Henderson began reshaping the face of local politics by becoming the first black woman to be voted to the Detroit City Council. She went on to the council presidency in 1977, eventually becoming one of the most powerful women in city and state politics until she surrendered her seat on the council in 1989 to run against Young for mayor. (She lost, and there are plenty around Detroit who still wonder whether the city did, too.)

Sure, Young blazed trails, but Henderson, as the saying goes, did it in heels. Her accomplishments, historic impact and unyielding love for this city were so great that she continued to hold the title of council president emeritus long after she'd left the political stage.

In her wake, she also left a new generation of political figures, many of them black, many of them women.

"She showed women around the world we could fly as high as we dared to dream," said U.S. Rep. Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick, a Detroit Democrat.

A staunch human-rights activist, Henderson was a mover-and-shaker who never rose above the people she served. You could often find her at one community meeting or another, huddling with seniors or talking to young people about public service. (I remember her showing up on my college campus 20 years ago to talk with a bunch of us students who'd taken over an administration building in a protest. We were scared she'd chide us. Instead, smiling and sweet, she encouraged us to keep up the struggle.) And though she didn't wield the sort of fiery temperment that made Young famous, she was as tough and relentless a political fighter as Detroit could want.

Henderson's career on the Detroit City Council ended 20 years ago, she made one pledge to her constituents: "I will never be quiet."

And she still isn't. Even now, with her voice gone silent, Erma Henderson's legacy continues to resonate for all to hear.

Rest In Peace, Mother...You've earned it.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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