Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Holy Day: The Life of a Michigan Fan

For many people here, today will be sacred: the match between two of college football's biggest rivals, the University of Michigan, and Ohio State University. There will be moments of anger and bliss. I'll watch it all in Ann Arbor, Mich., at what those of us who love the Wolverines call the Big House.

My distaste for Ohio State began during my sophomore year at Michigan. I'd just transferred from Oakland University, in the Detroit suburbs. Oakland didn't have a football team – which made life at the school boring. I got sick of hearing people there say, “But we have a great basketball team.” I even wrote a midterm paper about why Oakland needed football. The central argument: Football is one of the best ways to build school pride. Shortly thereafter, I packed my futon and mini-fridge and left for Ann Arbor.

As a transfer student who ended up in one of the farthest dorms from campus and was uninterested in joining a sorority, I found it difficult to make good friends during my first year at the U. of M. Any sadness I felt for my lack of friends forced me further into the happiness that Michigan football brought—I became obsessed and tried to teach myself everything I could. I learned about the Snow Bowl of 1950, when Michigan and Ohio still played – despite 10-degree air, five inches of snow and 29-m.p.h winds. I learned that former Ohio State coach Woody Hayes preferred to “coast” in his car over the state line than to buy even gas from a station within Michigan's borders.  I stopped wearing red – Ohio State's main color – and risked my job as a server at a campus sports bar by refusing to work on game days.  My managers said every server was required to be available on Saturdays; I said that it wouldn't be fair to make me work in place of any of the other 15 available servers, who didn't get as excited as I did when Chad Henne (the starting QB at the time) came in for takeout on Wing Tuesdays.

Things changed after that sophomore year: I began making great friends, and my passion for Michigan football grew. I began to dislike the entire state of Ohio (with the exception of Sandusky, which I still prefer to think of as its own separate Cedar Point-owned territory). I even began preparing for the last game of every year by playing Ohio State myself, via NCAA Football on PlayStation 2. Oh, and I found a boyfriend who used to play football for Michigan—a crucial component in my decision to commit to him. When he surprised me with tickets to my first Michigan bowl game, I knew it was love.

To some of us, this rivalry is more than entertainment. It has to do with me publicly confessing that I'm still grossed out when someone says they went to Ohio State.  It has to do with my attempt to explain Saturday's significance to Wolverine fans.

Although Michigan football is no longer my only friend, it is still one of my best friends, and when you know that your best friend's worst enemy is coming to town for a faceoff, you have to be prepared. I'll be prepared when I get to the golf course to tailgate early Saturday morning with my lucky maize game-day gloves.  Mid-tailgate, I'll spend just the amount of time it takes to cook a hotdog to conduct pre-game reflections, alone with my grill.  Then, about 20 minutes before kick-off, I'll take a deep breath and make my way to where I'll watch the game, from a seat inside of the Big House.

Go Blue.

(Kristy Erdodi, 24, is a special contributor to TIME's Detroit Blog.)

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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