Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Learning to cope or what a career coach discovered in Detroit

Monday was another crushing day for Metro Detroit. Advertising agency BBDO announced it was shuttering its Troy and Windsor offices, putting some 485 people out of work. The closure comes as the agency's largest client, Chrysler, decided to spread its advertising budget among a number of firms. (The agency, which could close as early as January, has hope it will find new work before then.)

It's the end to a long and painful march toward extinction. According to Ad Age:

Back in 2000, when BBDO emerged the big winner in Chrysler's agency consolidation, the account was estimated to be worth $2.4 billion, and the agency's Detroit office -- exclusively devoted to serving the Dodge, Jeep and Chrysler brands -- numbered some 2,000 staffers. In 2009, amidst squeezed fees and contracted scope of work, the Chrysler account today is worth less than half that in billings, and staff at BBDO Detroit has dwindled to less than 500.

Where do these people go next? Most likely, they will end up unemployed for months if not a year or more. Some will end up at ad agencies out of state. Others might find new careers within Michigan – emphasis on might.

Because November is National Career Development Month, I had asked Michael Cushman to give the Detroit blog some ideas on how to approach the job hunt. It seems like the right time to share his words.

Cushman served as a career coach on the eLearners.com Empowerment Tour, which traveled across the United States this summer offering free career coaching. During his stay in Detroit, Cushman and the other coaches met with more than 100 people looking for help with their careers. Cushman changed the names, but the stories are true. Here are a few people they counseled and some lessons to share.

*

I met a proud, loyal man with eyes clouded by tears. Daniel, 50, worked his life, for one firm, as an auto-claims adjuster. He shows me three binders. One contains all his rejection letters. Another has his resume, cover letters, references, and awards. The third is full of work samples. No doubt about it, Daniel meticulously dedicated his life to his profession and applies his thoroughness to his job search.

Daniel's situation is classic: a well paid, highly experienced older worker, only able to find openings at greatly reduced pay. He's taken his layoff personally. He can't help himself, but in interviews, he shows everyone his binders to “prove” that his unemployment isn't his fault and to demonstrate his superior knowledge and experience. All the while, his bitterness seeps out.

Since Daniel's identity is tied to his profession, his best approach is making a lateral move, to property and casualty, for example. He will likely take a pay cut, but it will be a new position and he will not have to be an underpaid expert.

Every year, 15 percent of jobs come and go, because companies, industries and professions come and go. If technology makes it possible for someone with little experience to perform nearly as well as someone with 30 years experience, companies are going to go with the technology and younger, less expensive employees.

Job markets are going through convulsions, while innovation relentlessly accelerates. Layoffs happen by the millions. It's not about you, personally. No one is judging. Bitterness is emotional Ebola. And nothing you think or say will bring back your old world.

People tend to overestimate their inability to cope. The truth is that challenges bring out our hidden capabilities. Most people should send the old career to the attic, or throw a wake, bury the past, and move on. Career transitions are opportunities to jump into something new that excites you and taps into your natural talents.

Sure, it's scary. Like a child at the end of the diving board, feel the fear and do it anyway. Besides, what's the alternative? Crawling up into a ball? For many, now is the time to give yourself permission to reinvent your life. Who knows, you might realize that you have been living in a fur-lined rut for years. If the old life is gone, make a new one. Leap off the board with passion! Surprise yourself.

Consider Bernice. She is unemployed with many years invested into processing insurance claims. She's burnt out. Currently, she publishes a church newsletter, enjoys it and wants to learn more. Money is tight and she doesn't have all the time in the world. Now what?

Basically, she can create a portfolio of her design work. If it's good, people will contract her services. To explore fields and opportunities, I recommend networking sites, such as meetup.com. There are 370 meetup groups within 25 miles of Detroit that meet for free or near free. Joining is a great way to find local people with the same interests as you and to explore possible careers.

Then there is Melika, who is 16 years old and going to be a marine biologist. How do I know anything about being a marine biologist? On an 18 hour flight from L.A. to Beijing, I sat next to and talked with a marine biologist. Going back 25 years, I ran the beaches in San Diego and watched March Madness for several years with an office neighbor and shark expert, Marty Snyderman, who has written several books on California marine life.

Have you considered how many fascinating people you rode the elevator with, sat next to on a plane or in church and never met, because you never said “hi”? If the answer is, “too many” then turn off the iPod and make curiosity about people a habit. You will be surprised to find that everyone you meet connects to someone else in your life, and in some way, every stranger's story enriches you.

Finally, there's Rachel, a sophomore, pre-med, who wants a long-term, part-time, customer service job to help pay for school. Her foot wiggles, fingers fidget, sweat beads above her upper lip and she chokes her vocal cords. After only a couple of minutes of working together, Rachel's stress melts away and a broad, warm, confident smile brightens her face.

If you feel uncomfortable and stressed in job interviews, do this: straighten your spine, hold your head high and play it big when you are talking about what you know and do best. Remember, you are the expert when it comes to talking about your opinions, talents, and experiences.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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