Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser
One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Metro nonprofits feeling the pinch of Michigan's erratic economy

Any non-profit organization will tell you that fund-raising is one of its more difficult tasks. So what happens when you run a non-profit in one of the most economically challenged regions in the nation?

This past year has been a horror show for Michigan's charities, with 50 percent reporting decreases in revenue (individual giving, foundations, government and corporate support) and 70 percent reporting increases in demand, according to the Michigan Nonprofit Association.

So it is time to get creative. And that is exactly what Cynthia Kidder has always done, no matter what the circumstances.

Kidder is the founder of Band of Angels Foundation, a national organization based in Rochester Hills dedicated to supporting children with Down syndrome and their families. She started the group in 1994, five years after her son, Jordan, was born with the chromosomal abnormality. (October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month.)

Kidder is used to challenges these days. Her board members, mostly executives at large Michigan-based corporations, keep getting downsized or transferred.

Her biggest fund-raising event, the Starry Night Gala, hit major roadblocks this year. Corporate donations for March event were down 90 percent or about $70,000.

Kidder is now starting to organize next year's gala. And things already look grim.

“It's very scary to be in Detroit. You always wonder where the funding is coming from,” Kidder admited.

Her next theme will center on Michigan's growing film industry, perhaps under the theme “Live Your Dream.”
At the moment, she has a vendor willing to donate a backdrop or two for people to act out famous movie scenes – and Kidder is pushing to get five or six or seven more.

“I decided to look at it as our adventure in fundraising,” Kidder said. “It's about being resilient – and I think resiliency is more necessary than ever.”

Last year, Kidder got inventive. She and the organizing committee came up with a new theme: “Reinvent. Reimagine. Redefine.” Guests were encouraged to wear tuxedos or gowns already in their closets. The foundation reused centerpieces from previous events. As part of the festivities, a local jeweler took people's old gems and put them into new settings.

There is a bright side, Kidder said. People who normally would not have time to meet with her suddenly have time on their calendars. When she meets new people, Kidder notes whether they have family members with disabilities. That way, when she needs help she knows who she can tap on the shoulder.

Sure, it is time consuming. But like her son, helping people with disabilities is not a burden, Kidder said.

“I feel like this is what I was called to do,” Kidder said. “Plus, I'm pretty good at it.”

To check out Kidder's Foundation, buy some of her cool products or donate, hit this button right

  • Print
  • Comment

Add Your Comment:

You must be logged in to post a comment.
The Detroit Blog Daily E-mail

Get e-mail updates from TIME's The Detroit Blog in your inbox and never miss a day.

 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser
 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

+ READ ARTICLE

When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser