Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Ditchin' Religion

The Freedom from Religion Foundation, a group of atheists, agnostics and freethinkers, recently kicked off an interesting advertising campaign in metro Detroit — and I, for one, am hoping people pay attention.

Forgive me for saying this, but, as much as I love this town, we put too much faith in these ministers, their big churches and the feel-good rhetoric they sell on Sundays. (And yes, I do mean "sell.") Personally, I stopped believing in the supernatural long ago — the Lions' minor miracle notwithstanding — but this isn't about personal philosophy. Indeed, were it just that, I wouldn't see nearly as much need for the billboard campaign.

But in Detroit, we often pride ourselves on our narrow-minded and overzealous embrace of religious dogma. We let religion deter us from common-sense decisions, such as teaching our children science instead of creationist nonsense or truly respecting the separation of church and state. We too easily give a pass to anyone who hides behind the language of Christianity or Islam, and ne'er-do-well political and business hucksters who know this too often play us like fools for it.

For instance, when former mayor Kwame Kilpatrick finally decided Detroiters deserved to hear him publicly discuss the sex-and-perjury allegations against him, he didn't speak from the mayor's office. Instead, he holed up in a church, just him, his wife and a lone TV camera, and spoke unchallenged about his desire for voters' forgiveness. Even through the subsequent efforts to oust him, he was constantly seeking cover behind assorted "ministerial alliances" to provide him with the veneer of respectability. And too often, the preachers were more than willing to give him that cover if it meant greater political access.

You can't walk two city blocks here without passing somebody's church, most of them open just long enough for Sunday services, choir rehearsals and the occasional gospel brunch. (As as kid, I used to hear even church-goers compare the many churches in town to the many liquor stores and wonder aloud what good either really did for us.) Meanwhile, in almost every neighborhood where these churches abound and thrive, the rest of community continues to crumble.

I don't blame the churches for the structural problems in Detroit, of course. But I can't help but wonder how much better our communities could be if we put even half the energy that we invest in keeping these pastors well-heeled into our public schools, politics, finances or businesses. Like the people behind the billboard campaign, I can't help but imagine a Detroit without the false faith.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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