Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

The Naked City

A strong head nod to Jeff Gerritt at the Detroit Free Press for a good common-sense column the other day on the clash between strip club owners in Detroit and the City Council.

I really don't see the point of these proposed "crackdowns," other than to offer morality theater to the popular religious figures who show up at council meetings to bemoan the sinfulness of it all. Yes, 33 nudie bars in a city this size is a bit much -- but I also think that suggests a pretty big market for them. And since the clubs are not only legal but also the source of hundreds of paying jobs and millions in tax revenues for the city, where's the logic in trying to drive them out of town (especially when it's not like you'll put them out of business)?

Further, if you've grown up in this city like I have and know anything about the strippers here, you know good and well that adult nightclub money does not stop at the city coffers. Much of the tips and salaries earned by the dancers (and DJs and barmaids and bouncers) also flows into small businesses around metro Detroit, including restaurants, corner stores, nightclubs, car dealerships, gas stations, barbershops and hair salons, day-care centers, kids' clothiers, insurance agencies and, goodness knows, landlords. Should I also mention church "love offerings?"

Now, I know the "values" crowd finds stripping immoral so perhaps these folks don't care about the economic arguments. And although I think it's ridiculous to deem stripping "wrong," I will admit that, as a father of two girls, I'm with Chris Rock on what a dad's obligations are with regard to the pole. But frankly, his admonition is about how we men want to measure ourselves. What do our artificial yardsticks have to do with the economic realities faced by poor and working-class moms raising kids alone in a city and state posting record unemployment numbers? And why should the fact that stripping is not the option I'd choose for my children mean that another consenting adult can't have the right to choose for herself? (I mean, I'm also determined to keep my kids out of the GOP.)

I don't mind the regulation of strip clubs. There are already more than enough ordinances -- many of them superfluous -- to cover any crime you could imagine in or around a strip bar. And let's keep it real: Many of these are almost never enforced anyway.

So yeah, I see little point in hounding strippers just to appease disapproving preachers. I mean, it's not like anybody is asking the ministers for taxes on their churches or anything.

As far as I'm concerned, if they're willing to devote more time to worthwhile issues, like preserving school funding, they should even keep those love offerings.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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