Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

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The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Downsized but not down and out

Tameka Gutierrez is a girlie girl. Pink cell phone. Pink laptop. You get the picture.

So it is hard to imagine this petite flower working the assembly line at Chrysler's truck plant in Warren, building big ol' Dodge Rams and Dakotas. But she did, putting in 11 years there. She loved the pay, hated the stench. She suffered through stitches (the result of using air tools for too long) and broken bones (fractured ankle from a forklift accident).

Even then, she had a Plan B. Gutierrez wanted her own store and, eventually, a clothing and cosmetics line. Her drive was so strong that the Harper Woods resident registered a business name eight years ago in hopes of making it happen.

These days, it seems everyone in Metro Detroit has a Plan B. With two out of three auto companies barely out of bankruptcy, no one wants to be hanging out there unprepared. Forget being a lifer and a fat pension. Right now, we all just want to maintain whatever kind of life we have.

Part of the problem is people weren't worried or frugal or whatever when they earned $30 or more an hour plus lots of overtime. Families bought big houses, boats, you name it on the basis that the good times would roll on forever. (What do they say about people who assume too much?)

Back to Gutierrez. She is a prime example of how to do it right. While she held a steady 40-hour job, she earned a Bachelor's degree in fashion design. She worked days while her husband worked the second shift to share caretaking duties of their two daughters.
On her off hours, she went to fashion shows, visited vendors, sniffed around empty storefronts. But she held onto that steady paycheck because it meant something to her, to her family.

Then, things changed. She got bumped. That means Chrysler told her to change shifts or else. So Gutierrez started working midnights. So when buyouts came around, she was the first to turn in her paperwork.

“It was an awesome run, but my time was over,” Gutierrez said.

Last year, she opened What a Girl Wants, a women's apparel and accessory boutique on tony Mack Avenue in Grosse Pointe. Yes, a black woman with a fashion-forward clothing store in quite possibly the whitest suburb in Southeast Michigan. And everyone shops there -- tweens, plus-sizes, even the more mature matrons of Lakeshore Drive.

Gutierrez loves it. Every single second. Even the days when she has three customers and only one buys something.

“I have good weeks and I have bad weeks,” Gutierrez said. “I'm in it for the long term.”

She talked to two financial planners before going solo. Her husband and uncle painted the store and got it ready to open. Gutierrez bought all of her store's fixtures from a going-out-of-business sale at a local mall. Display tables that normally cost $1,200 she picked up for $30.

Gutierrez even skips cable television at the store to save the $88 every month. She decorated the store with pictures her vendors sent her. She only orders new merchandise when something else sells.

“There is a middle where you can find good, quality clothing at an affordable price,” Gutierrez said.

Maybe the auto companies could learn a few things from one of their own.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

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When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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