Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

"Get My Loot"

When I first heard about the hotly contested Proposal D — a ballot initiative that, if passed, would permit Detroiters to elect the majority of its City Council by district rather than to at-large seats — I had doubts. We can all imagine boogeymen behind any number of political ideas, and when it came to Prop. D, I had visions of newly minted ward bosses running amok. In a city where name recognition alone has won votes for the likes of disgraced ex-council president Monica Conyers and current councilwoman/R&B barnstormer Martha Reeves, it's not hard to imagine Detroit council districts being turned into a ward heeler's ball.

But then a few other things occurred to me. First, because all members are currently elected to "at-large" seats, the Detroit City Council, in the guise of being accountable to everybody, is too often accountable to nobody. Consider, for instance, the brazen criminality of Conyers, who once ordered a bagman to "get my loot" from a shakedown target. (And then try not to think about the council crimes that haven't been exposed.) And that's not to say there aren't engaged, caring council members. There are. But not nearly enough.

Second, the "at-large" system makes it too easy to exclude some vital segments of our community from council seats. For instance, while I'm damned proud of Detroit's standing as a bastion of real black political power, I'm also disturbed that a city run by historically disenfranchised folks often marginalizes other historically disenfranchised folks. I mean, Latinos run southwest Detroit, but too often have to struggle for proportionate influence at City Hall.

Third, I'd like to hope that the power to elect council members directly from the neighborhoods will help ignite many Detroiters' passion for the political process, especially young voters. Those involved in local politics are some of the most zealous, energetic and hopeful voices in town. They are citizens in full. But they are still outnumbered by the voters whose political laziness affords carte blanche to the scoundrels and fools.

Mostly, though, I like the idea of Prop. D passing because I just think real democracy is largely the politics of voters getting what and whom they vote for -- and, therefore, what and whom they deserve.

Of course, whether the council members come from districts or fill at-large posts, the key to making any of this work is that all voting Detroiters pay attention to the people tasked with doing their business. A city strapped with a $300-million deficit deserves a surplus of accountable leadership.

It's past time Detroiters were able to turn to the people they've elected and say, simply, "Get my loot."

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

+ READ ARTICLE

When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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