Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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One year. One city. Endless opportunities.

Detroit, No Chaser...

So I'm posted up at a party the other night, celebrating Time's shiny new media effort here in Detroit, watching the best and brightest mingle and toast and congratulate themselves for daring to do this in the D…

…and all I can think about is how horribly wrong it can go...

Be for real: Detroit – at least the city proper, which birthed and reared me – doesn't usually go well with Big Media. The mixture can too often be a nasty brew of sensationalism and too-easy narratives, lazily or hastily sketched caricatures of an America in decline.

On the flip side, Detroiters usually don't appreciate the mix even when – nah, especially when — it hits home. Nobody likes looking bad (and we just know we're going to wind up looking bad), but few places have our capacity to resist criticism even when it's deadly accurate. If an entire town can harbor collective deep-seated insecurities, we've got ‘em. We rail against the portraits of us – as a city too poor, too drained, too far along in decline to ever bounce back – partially because many of us fear them to be true.

Still, it's one thing to recognize that it's tough to properly mix Big Media with the Motor City. And it's another thing to know that, no matter what you concoct, it'll almost always be tough for many of us to swallow.

But now, I've been asked to help tend bar.

And because I love this town – what we used to be, what we are, what we strive to become — I'm going to try my hand at it. So welcome to my blog.

I can't promise my special house blends will always go down smooth. But I'll do my best to add it all in, and that includes ingredients – voices, people, places from every quarter of this town – that don't always abound in the admixtures major media serves up.

Detroit is still a beautiful, diverse and magical place. We're not just an old Packard plant or a dilapidated train station or an O-fer football team. We're festivals and concerts, artwork and architecture (and the Red Wings!) -- and because I know this, I look forward to the days when what I offer does go down easy.

But Detroit is also a troubled city, a place where race and class divide, families struggle, industries crumble and bureaucrats steal. I know this, too – and so there will be days when there ain't much sweet.

Of course, much of the mix will fall somewhere in between. And whatever the blend, I'll always try to serve it straight up.

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 Arduboy Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale - TIME
TIME Gadgets

Business Card Plays Tetris, Might Be for Sale Soon

TAKE MY MONEY!

+ READ ARTICLE

The above video showcases a credit card-sized whatsit with a built-in screen, control pad and two buttons. It plays Tetris! If you’re not convinced by now that we’re either at or very near the pinnacle of human ingenuity, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to convince you otherwise and I’m not sure it’s worth your time to keep reading this. We should amicably go our separate ways.

For the rest of you, this project is called Arduboy. It’s about a millimeter and a half thick and apparently packs north of nine hours of battery life. Its creator, Kevin Bates, created the proof-of-concept you see in the above video and has plans to roll out a Kickstarter campaign to sell these things, complete with a website where people can share other types of software and games they create for Arduboy.

Bates writes on his site that he wants to use Kickstarter to raise $820 to cover licensing costs. I write here that he’ll probably be able to raise that amount faster than he can clear the first level of Tetris. He’ll also probably have to sell the cards without a game loaded onto them to avoid legal issues, though.

No word on how much a final version would cost, but you can visit Bates’ website to read more about how the project came together, complete with photos of the Qdoba and REI gift cards he used to test some of the early builds.

My business card plays Tetris [YouTube via The Next Web]

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 MIT Student Creates Connect Four Playing Robot for Course Final - TIME
TIME technology

This Robot Would Very Much Like to Play a Game of Connect Four With You

Game on

+ READ ARTICLE

When the singularity finally hits and artificial intelligence takes over everything, at least we know some of the robots will know how to have a good time — like this Connect Four-playing bot, programmed by MIT student Patrick McCabe.

Users can choose between four levels of difficulty and can even ask for a hint if needed. Head over to McCabe’s website for a detailed breakdown of how the machine works. In the meantime, watch here as the bot beats McCabe in the first round — and even taunts him a little bit before clinching the game.

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